Colorfilled Abstracts – Paul Jenkins

Artist Paul Jenkins filled his abstract canvases with roll the dice, sizzling color. “I utilise past experience and my knowledge of the odds.  It is a big gamble, and that is why I love it,” Jenkins said about his approach.  I can relate. Art is a risk. Its always a gamble.

Paul Jenkins colorfilled abstracts, debiriley.com
Paul Jenkins detail

 

Paul Jenkins

Paul Jenkins was born 1923 in Missouri, USA.  He traveled abroad, studied with several well known artists of the day including Yasuo Kuniyoshi for four years.  Jenkins died in 2012 in New York City.

Jenkins often called himself, an Abstract Phenomenist.  His works are bold expressions of color balanced by the softly merging edges.

When asked about the titles for his paintings, Jenkins responded, “I have conversations with them and they tell me what they want to be called.”

He was very much in tune with his work, in a dialogue.  Allowing the paints and support to do their thing, while he ‘guided’ the process, rather than forcing it.

 

 

Abstract Painting Technique

The painting technique Jenkins used involved  liquid, fluid paints being poured into targeted areas onto a canvas and allowing the colors to softly diffuse and merge together.

Jenkins painted large, thought nothing of using trash bins to pour paint onto canvases and papers.

Jenkins pouring debiriley.com
Paul Jenkins Pouring

 

He didn’t use a brush, but often used a special ivory knife to guide paints along in certain directions.

Jenkins abstract color palette   often included Indigo, Cerulean, Scarlet red, Lemon yellow, Viridian Emerald greens, Ultramarine blue.

 

 

jenkins abstracts debiriley.com
Paul Jenkins Abstracts

 

Paul Jenkins was quite versatile as an artist. He worked in oils, acrylics, watercolors, inks, sculpture and lithography.  Apparently he enjoyed risk taking, and being an ‘out of the box’ non traditional artist!

 

 

Summary

Things I learned from Paul Jenkins

 

  1. Go for broke!  For The LOVE  of Color –  Paint bolder, more color, more abstract
  2. Try using a larger pouring vessel  i.e.  trash bins, buckets
  3. Limit the palette in order to avoid MUD
  4. Experiment with fluid oils on a pure white canvas  background
  5. Line up 5 BIG canvases outside, and start pouring

 

 

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28 comments

  1. wonderful, somehow they remind me of beautiful flowers, Debi. Hope you are fine, I just got an infection of the middle ear. Why didn’t I get an infection of the lower ear?? hehe Wishing you a wonderful week-end, kind regards Mitza

    Like

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