Tag: prussian blue pb27

Cobalt Teal Blue: Stages of Art

Cobalt Teal Blue: Stages of Art

 

“We arrive totally new

at the various stages of life and

there we often lack experience

despite the number of our years.”

Francoise de La Rochefoucauld VI  1613  French writer

 

cobalt teal blue abstract, la rochefoucauld quote, debiriley.com
Stage One  Cobalt Teal Blue Abstract

 

In Stages

I think his quote sums up our experience with painting, art, as well.

 

Every time we think we attain a new level, get to the next stage, we discover ourselves beginners all over again.

 

Beginners don’t realise that this is ‘just what happens.’

Often as Beginners, we believe the journey will be smooth sailing, once we learn the basics.

That the there won’t be much more mystery, or challenges, or setbacks after that.

 

 

Those who have been at it longer, know differently.  Know the drill.

Because, as long as our innate artistic curiosity remains,  there will be challenges.

 

We have been down the path enough times before not to be overly discouraged.

 

We know…. to wait it out.

To work it out.

abstract blues, cobalt teal blue painting, debiriley.com
Stage Two

 

 

La Rochefoucauld

I chose La Rochefoucauld to quote from today, for two reasons.

The quote content suited the post and image, firstly.

 

Secondly, he isn’t one of the most well known writers people have read about.

But, he has so many quotes, maxims that are valuable gems.

Just as applicable in 2018 as they were in the 1600’s.

 

And Art, is about discoveries.

About curiosity that is never ending.

 

 

reference for painting abstract of water, debiriley.com
original reference photo

 

The springboard, the origins of the painting came from the photo of water in green blue.

Not really a magnificent specimen on its own.

However, it does not need to be.

 

The reference sources only need to Inspire.

To ignite within the artist a desire to create something more, something going Beyond that initial photo.

 

 

Abstract Art

As an abstract, it need not Be anything.

It doesn’t have to represent a boat, house, flower, lake, ocean, etc.

Its non-representational.

 

abstract expressionism, acrylic painting on canvas, debiriley.com
The Pond,  Abstract 

 

If,  a painting was Semi-Abstract then,  we would be able to discern perhaps that an area might be a sky shape.

Another shape, could infer a shrouded figure, or a boat out upon misty waters.  This, is what a Semi Abstract painting is.

 

Lunar Black, Quincacridone Sienna, Daniel Smith watercolors, debiriley.com
Smoke and Fire  – semi abstraction

 

Impressionist, we can detect straight away that something is a flower, a tree, car, cup, etc.

Maybe not, the exact precise street address of the place.

More the mood and feeling of the place or person though.

Autumn Color watercolor landscape, how to fix a watercolor painting, fall tree colors, debiriley.com
moods of autumn watercolor & pastel landscape:  Society6 shop

 

Botanical art is very precise.  We will know what type of flower it is, the species, etc.

The measurements, the ratios, will all be correct.

Everything leaves, petals, stamens, roots, etc. will be exact in their detail.

 

 

 

Abstract cobalt teal #9 

Abstract art  – A Definition 

Cobalt Teal Sea Sirens 

 

 

 

 

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Softening the edges …art and nature

Softening the edges …art and nature

As many things do…. it held,  Promise.

This old watercolor landscape.

It sat upon the studio table among 20 others, all needing further contemplation, further work.

 

 

 

watercolor techniques for beginners, soften edges watercolour, impressionist landscapes trees, prussian blue mixes watercolour foliage, debiriley.com
Soften the Edges, watercolor basics

 

Watercolor Landscape Painting

How old was it?

How long did I hold it in reserve?

I’m smiling…. it may shock some, but it is about 15 years old.

 

I know I’ve mentioned it before, but its so true;

when   I don’t know precisely how to   use my brush to resolve a thing – I Stop.

Pause.

Put it aside.

And go on to work on the other papers and canvases I’ve laid out for myself.

 

 

I’ve come to realise that there will come a day,

when … it becomes crystal clear, exactly how to resolve the art work.

And then, it is so unbelievably easy!

 

 

Beginners’  Frustrations

I understand the beginner’s frustrations.

 

The urge to shred the result that did not (YET) meet nor yet match the vision within one’s mind.

But,

it is key, to note the word …. “Yet.”

 

It is important to be aware that as Beginners, we can not possibly do it as we wish to, right now.

We can’t jump into the pilot’s seat and fly the plane, swooping and diving, rolling and performing the aero gymnastics.

 

There will come a day.

When each task, each skill, becomes second nature.

 

 

 

Back to Work…..

So.  I’m back to the old watercolor painting and deep in thought.

 

I consider the outer edges and have realised they’re far too sharp, abrupt.

Those outer bordering edges are too hard.

They need gentled.

 

 

Even though the painting is so old, with watercolor,  I can still soften the edges.

I’m in luck.

 

But, the paper I chose was a smooth hot press type, so it requires a more delicate touch.

Had I used Arches Rough or even Cold Press,  I could have been more vigorous in my approach here.

Knowing your paper, is critical for making those resolutions successful.

 

 

Once the perimeter edges are softened sufficiently to my eye, I rotate the image.

I decide that I’m pleased with it more with the weight being on the right and the bottom.

Rather than Top and left, as before.

 

 

The other change-up I’ve played with is the matting.

I wanted to see how it might look, if it was surrounded in white.

But moved towards the left.  I was ‘curious.’

 

 

 

watercolor impressionist landscape, softening edges for depth, prussian blue foliage greens, patience persistence, not fiddling with watercolors, debiriley.com
Reflecting Soft Edges

 

Promises

 

As many things do,

the painting, held promise.

 

What we do to and with that creation,  what our outlook, our approach is,   determines if the promise is realised or not.

 

I think in this case, at least,  I was able to exercise the “Goldilocks” approach.

Nothing was taken away to destroy the lovely enthusiastic promise the painting had from the beginning.

 

The subtle resolutions  that,  for so long I was blind to,  oblivious to….

Now, came easy.

Yes.  After a long wait.

 

 

When I think about it,   this process in its own way, is ……

softening our ‘own edges’ in a round about way.

 

 

 

Follow Along Posts…….

3 Edges of Watercolor – Softening the Edges

Natures Edges – so soft and gentle   

Prussian Blue mixing  and greens 

Impressionist Landscapes in Watercolor 

Relax,  but  don’t fiddle 

Resolving, altering paintings    –  changing the look of old paintings 

 

 

 

 

There will come a day.

When each task, each skill, ….softening edges …….becomes second nature.

 

 

 

Addictive, Sheer Fun … Monoprinting

Addictive, Sheer Fun … Monoprinting

Addictive, yes.  But in a such a good way!

This is the kind of Addiction, that is good for us.

 

 

monoprinting in blue, handprinting, abstractions in prussian blue, debiriley.com
Sheer Fun……..     Monoprinting by Maureen

Monotypes and Monoprints

These were the focus for this week’s process…. at work.

 

They are two of the best techniques that I’ve used in sessions that always help participants let loose.

To let go.

 

To disentangle themselves from the rigidity of standards, regulations, rules.

And the demands of that voice within that whispers,

Where is, The Product?

and …   how Good, is it, really?”

 

 

Yes.  Monotypes and Monoprints are my ‘go to’  topics for when, the group needs to be encouraged to –   just let go.

 

 

monotype handprinting, purple floral patterns, fun art techniques, debiriley.com
Florals by Sue, monotype handprinting

 

 

Process  and Product

I love to encourage “process.”

“Process focus”  defeats fear.

 

Students, usually love to follow after the Product.

“Product focus,”   generally …. increases the likelihood of tenseness, fear, anxiousness.

 

Thus,  you can see the motivation  I have behind my strongly ‘Process based’  courses.

 

 

When we do monoprinting…. it is about the process.

And, wonderfully,   a plethora of prints pile up!

Not all are Rembrants.  Not all are ok.

But when we get a couple out of 10 that are pleasing,  how Lovely.

A bonus.

 

 

 

 

handprint on Stonehenge paper, still life subject monoprint, black ink on grey paper, debiriley.com
Monoprint on Stonehenge,  A sublime bouquet…. Libby

 

Monotype

Drawn onto the glass plate, (with a palette knife inked up)  then, the print was pulled.

A still life bouquet emerged.

Like magic.

 

 

A flick of the knife here and there.

Implies a vase is resting on a table.

With a few scatterings of leaves and a floral shape or two.

There is mystery here.

Inferences and subtle suggestions.

 

 

This is very zen,  very wabi sabi.      

Nothing…. is All spelled out for us.

We must, engage.

Enter the scene.

and so – we stay awhile, to figure it out.

 

Well done Libby!!

 

 

monotype in black ink, powerful design, fun art techniques, debiriley.com
same image, look now for a seated woman

 

Another Perspective

 

If,  you now look at the top a shape emerges as a head.

Maybe she wears a cap or beret?   Her face, well only the mouth can be seen….. as she glances over to our right.

 

And her body and torso angle downwards to our right.

It seems as though, she may be wearing a belted dress, or coat.

 

She appears to have a large fluffy scarf or hat perhaps upon her lap.

And , and (her right)  shoulder extends out and then in.

As if its then resting on her hip.

Is she  standing or is she seated….?

 

 

This type of image is the kind that makes for Excellent series.

You can do, hundreds of creative things with it.

 

Thats why its so important, to stop.  To pause.

To leave it alone.

To come back later with fresh eyes.

You can then fully harness its potential, rather than spoiling it by fiddling about.   

 

 

monotype handprinting, green prints of water, debiriley.com
Transitions of Greens, Joyce …monotype

 

The silken smooth dark to light transition of greens is really quite lovely.

Near black the dark green in foreground has a wonderful sense of depth.  The print pales off into the distance, allowing the viewer to travel through the image.  Even though, it is not quite finished, not quite representational – still we look and see and feel the depth.    This would be so very easy to return to, and put in just a couple of touches to ‘finish.’   Lovely.

 

 

 

monotype in blue, blue tree print, handprinting for beginners, debiriley.com
Lauren’s Leaning tree, Monotype

 

The blue knobby tree was handprinted.

Lauren used prussian blue ink,  a  Qtip  of all things,   was used to apply and draw the ink onto the plate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

All of these images, were so very kindly allowed onto my website by my class students.

 

….. please note that they are the owners of the images, with the sole right to copy, duplicate, sell or distribute.

 

 

Digital piracy is not ok.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to Basics – Simplicity

Return to Basics – Simplicity

Watercolors.  Back to Basics.

Simplicity…..   I like it.

Its about the basics.

Trying to express with the brush, what you see and ‘feel.’

 

 

watercolor techniques, painting Christmas trees, back to basics watercolor beginners, debiriley.com
Simplicity … it can be,   complicated

 

Simplicity

A watercolor Christmas holiday tree, kept nice and easy.

Not with all the hoopla, and dizzying busy-ness that makes our heads spin.

 

This was deliberate.

Created with simplicity in mind.

 

Done with  the specific targeted goal  of trying to paint  “simplicity.”

And then hoping,  that feeling of Simplicity,  might follow me around elsewhere.

Even if, it was just the rest of the day. Or week.

 

 

 

 

Creative Watercolor Zone

 

My mind was in the creative zone.

I shut off everything else.

 

This painting….

it didn’t take long.

I didn’t need to devote precious,  Time.

All I spent in total, was 5 minutes.

 

The brush danced along and I had fun watching it move.

Yes… I know,

I was holding the brush.

 

But I was really, only gently directing its pathways.

I wasn’t forcing it or ‘making it’  go anywhere.

 

There was no rigid tight control freak in charge….today.  I’m not, perfect!

 

 

It is this part of The Art Basics, that often gets left out of art classes.

The Partnership.

The one-ness between you and the brush, the paints, the papers, ie your materials.

 

And its this Partnership that enables you, to master Simplicity.

 

 

 

Extra

You might like to view Tony Smibert’s art images at smibert.com  

He is a current, internationally known artist who most certainly,

has mastered the art of Simplicity.

 

Magic happens in so few, beautiful brush strokes.

Tony works in both watercolors and abstracts, and acrylic on canvas.

Loveliness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Midnight Dreams: indigo

Midnight Dreams: indigo

There in the distance…. the deep velvet near black, midnight blue sky twinkles with stars.

So it seems.

 

 

indigo blue green collage, midnight blue acrylics on paper, debiriley.com
Midnight Dreams: indigo collage

 

Midnight Dreams

In my last post, I did promise a little more interesting “Title.”

Sometimes, artists do dream and then create.

So it was.

I didn’t capture the precise dream like qualities.

But I did convey the colors in the dream.

 

The Midnight Dream is expressed as:

A collage with torn papers and acrylic paints.

Indigo blue transitions to cobalt, then cerulean.

Finally the surface is bared with whites upon the foreground’s stark shape.

 

 

What, is it?

The shapes are vague.

Unformed.

 

I think, I’ll encourage your own imaginations to take over.

To imagine, what it could be. 

In your mind,  your dreams.

 

 

The theme of “dreams” has come in handy;

with  Watercolor  Daydreams II  and   Just Daydreams preceding this post & painting.

 

I just really, like the colors.

Indigo. Cerulean.  Prussian blue.   And those gorgeous blends of greens.

 

 

Design Elements

I enjoy this movement, direction, pathway the painting takes.

A little journey.

Upper left to centre.

Flowing downwards in a smooth diagonal path.

 

Atwell Students might also notice the other feature that plays such a major role here.

The tonal values, are plentiful.

 

The smooth gradation of tones from near black at the top, to the white at the base.

That’s what is guiding the viewer’s eye.

Its this,

that makes the viewer’s eye roam,  travel through the painting so easily.

 

And so, even if one  can’t quite pin down

what the painting represents exactly –

still, we can enjoy the journey it has taken us on.

 

In those Midnight Dreams. 

 

 

Blue Ice: painting in prussian blue

Blue Ice: painting in prussian blue

Blue Ice caught in between the shadows, cracks and crevices are the ultra rich tones of Prussian blue.

A thousand hues of blue, pool against the shores.

Captivating. Engaging.

Making us pay attention for a moment,  to become immersed in the swirls of color.

Those gorgeous textures that ask to be touched;

to be looked at just a little longer,  to be seen in their depths.

 

 

blue ice watercolor abstract, prussian blue pb27 watercolor, abstract watercolour in blue textures, debi riley art teacher, debiriley.com
Blue Ice, watercolor abstract

 

Blue Ice –  textures in watercolor

 

So we look.

Down the sides and slip into the shallows first.

 

Sinking.

Sinking into the reaches of the frigid waters,

 

flowing soft and deep

dark and rich and oh so cold.

 

Blue Ice.

 

 

 

Creating in “Prussian Blue”

 

“Blue Ice”  is part of a continuation of  Color Textures Lesson #6

as well as  Creativity Pass It Along  

Both posts lay the foundation for this creation.

 

Texture.

Texture was integral in the piece, with the molding paste applied onto the surface in random patterns.

 

Creativity.

My Creative imagination helped me to form and define the intangibles into something, from out of the chaos, slowly.

It, evolved.

I did go back in later, to darken a few areas.

This emphasised the places where it was needed and anchored those shapes more successfully.

 

 

The other player was Power of the  Blue.

Once again, I have chosen to use only blue for my painting.  Leaving the paste and gel mediums and the support surface to be my lights.

I used Prussian Blue pb27  watercolor.

The support is a canvas pad paper, you can see its woven texture quite well throughout the piece.

 

I enjoy the freedom and the creativity that painting in monochromatic palettes allow.   It seems like I might be restricted, constrained by only permitting myself the one color to use.  But I find it is utterly freeing.

Blue Ice would never have emerged, had I not set myself a monochromatic theme.  And I am very pleased with how the painting, Blue Ice finished up.

 

Power of The Blue

Power of The Blue

Delicate beauty and powerful imposing strength.  A compelling combination.

The whisper-like fragility of these gauze thin papers would seem to oppose that bold cocky bravado of blue.

Maybe.

Or is it, that this delicacy, this fragility is in fact, tempering the hard brash Power of the Blue?

 

prussian blue pb27 paint, paper collage techniques, using square formats, zen wabi sabi, debiriley.com
Little collage, delicate, strength

 

Blue Power #1

The collage featured began its life as a watercolor.

The paper used was quite heavy, but was student grade. Bockingford. And I wasn’t impressed with the results.

So it went  ‘unresolved’  and placed in my Later Box, for further inspirational.

 

 

Recent Resolutions

My idea was to make good use of the thick, sturdy paper as a support for a Collage.  While leaving hints of its texture visible.

Seemed like a good plan.

 

I chose super thin plain tissue papers along with some printmaking papers I have in my studio.

Masa and Unryu papers played a major role in the collage.

These assorted papers were torn, shaped, glued onto the larger heavier weight paper.

 

Gloss medium was used to adhere (ie collage)  the papers firmly onto the support.

I was quite generous with the ‘glue’ and did not skimp.

This was because I wanted the viewer to see the underlying textural quality of the heavy support paper ie Bockingford.

Its woven appearance,  added a lovely visual interest to the collage.

 

Watercolor Paints:

Daniel Smith Aztec Gold, is what I had on hand, for the gold paint.

The gold was applied at every stage.

The underlying washes were in thin diluted amounts; occasionally  I applied gold at the halfway mark.

The final touch, was with the gold. Skimming the gold right across the tips, the peaks of the paper folds.

 

Quinacridone Gold  – Daniel Smith  I used this sparingly.

It is a Staining paint, therefore is too easy to get carried away with its Boldness.

But, when I pay attention, and wash it out into dilute washes…. it is so lovely and pale. Just perfect.

 

Prussian Blue pb27  Venezia is  the student grade of Maimeriblu.

Venezia Prussian blue pb27   Item(402) at Dick Blick 

 

I’ve preferred this brand of Prussian Blue for over 15 years, for its depth, luminosity, tonal range.

I’ve had excellent success with the student range in Prussian Blue.

So, I use the less expensive about   $4  for the  15 ml tube. 

 

I know,  you are shocked.

“Student grade paint!”

But,  there are some excellent exceptions.

I have discovered some to work better (for what I want in paint results) than the leading professional brands.

 

 

Color Mixing – Limited Palette

Quin Gold mixed with Prussian Blue will create a massive range of blue-greens, greens, golden-greens.

Stunning.

These may be diluted with water to fade and be paler; softer.

Or used in strength for a big, bold, dramatic impact.

 

Two great colors to have on hand – Prussian Blue and Quinacridone Gold.

Hey….. Christmas is coming!!

 

 

 

Blue Power #2

Blue Zen.

This painting is acrylics on masonite board. Heavy applications of molding paste and impasto gel have been used.

 

Zen Beauty, blue and gold pairing, debi riley art techniques, wabi sabi, debiriley.com
Blue Zen:         molding paste &  impasto gel

 

Brilliant and Bold Band of Blue

I’ve included Blue Zen for its sheer dominating strength.

Its been seen before, but it is perfect for this post.

It helps illustrate how ‘imperfections’  can balance, can temper,  power.

 

 

Texture. Texture. Texture.

Thicker layerings of impasto medium were slathered over top the molding paste layer.

Creating peaks, ridges, valleys, crevices…. an abundance of texture.

Giving the crevices the appearance, the illusion they were on the verge …. of fracturing.

 

It is this sense of impending fragmentation that gives us a feeling of  fragility. 

It counteracts and balances  –  the nearly overwhelming power of the blue.

 

 

Design

The very dominant horizontal blue band along the bottom, pulls, draws the eye down.

Its inescapable.

We can’t help but go there.

But with all that texture above (about 95% of the image)  we aren’t ‘trapped’ either.

We can, allow our eye to return upwards, following the path that is there for us.

There is a Design in this piece. And it helps make the painting work.

 

 

Both paintings show how important a sense of delicate fragility, of gentleness are,  in order to balance  the power of the blue