Cerulean and Prussian Blue Pair Up

Power house Prussian  blue and sensitive cerulean team up beautifully together in landscapes, still life or abstract paintings.  Lights and Darks contrast perfectly on the full sheet,  22 x 30 inch cotton rag watercolor paper.

 

prussian blue pb27, watercolor landscape mountain, cerulean blue, debi riley watercolor,  debiriley.com
Mountain Prussian Blue watercolors, debiriley.com

 

 

 

Prussian Blue

 

Prussian blue pb27 is a very intense strong dark midnight blue with a huge tonal range. It can go from nearly black to a very pale white tint.

Quite a powerful colour  I find very useful for mixing landscape, tree, foliage greens as it is a fantastic mixer –  without going muddy.

The Staining pigments tend to provide a flatter, more even, uniform wash of colour. Very good glazers.

 

 

Cerulean Blue

Cerulean blue has a lovely softness to it that  makes it ideal for atmospheric and landscape elements.

It is a much paler blue than prussian and does a great job of creating greens as well when used with winsor lemon,  quinacridone gold, raw umber and burnt umber.

 

Combining a granulating pigment – Cerulean blue Pb35  (which provides textural effects) with a Staining pigment – Prussian blue Pb27   does a fantastic job of creating  a lovely ‘vibrating’ contrast.

 

 

Mountain Painting 

The painting,  Mountain in Blue  has  a wide variety of blue tones. And  features  Prussian and Cerulean as they cascade downwards into the foreground.

A dash of burnt umber, raw umber, manganese,  were used as well to finish the piece.

 

 

 

 

Embankment

The texture  in the image below, Embankment,  needed to be a balanced ratio of calm vs.  busy.

Generally,  I try to use the 2/3   calm and  1/3  busy  ratio…..  approximately.

 

I tried to maintain a sense of calmness to the image even in the midst of its strong bold colour and edges.

Part of the image was done on dry paper, the majority was done on wet/damp for the soft edges.

 

Embankment debiriley.com
Embankment
debiriley.com

The subtle hint of texture from cerulean, I created by blending it with a prussian/umber mix and then allowing it  to flow down.

This created lovely soft edges contrasting with the sharp vibrancy of the slashes of prussian & umber green  near the top.

 

 

 

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2 comments

  1. That’s a smart way of composing. I think the contrasting flowing paint works really well to generate depth and focus.

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